Canadian Politics (Provincial), Published Articles

Mixed local response to proposed Alberta riding changes

Originally published in the Whitecourt Star

The changes proposed to the Whitecourt-Ste. Anne riding by the Alberta Electoral Boundaries Commission’s May 25 Interim Report has received a variety of responses from local political leaders.

The report recommends adding three new ridings — one in Edmonton and two in Calgary — to account for their growing populations.

To maintain the current number of seats in the legislature, the report suggests three amalgamations of northern Alberta ridings, including one that would split Whitecourt Ste. Anne in two.

Under this formulation, Whitecourt and Woodlands County would join West Yellowhead, and Mayerthorpe and most of Lac St. Anne County would be absorbed by a new riding, Ste. Anne-Stony Plain.

Whitecourt Mayor Maryann Chichak was generally supportive of the changes, which she said reflect the province’s demographic reality.

“I think Whitecourt-Ste. Anne had a feeling that there may be some redistribution in our area, based on the fact that last time the redistribution was done, we were a little low on the population,” she said.

Chichak said that having Whitecourt join the West Yellowhead constituency, “puts us into a situation where we are with communities that have very similar industries as ours,” namely oil and gas, and forestry.

Edson, Hinton and Jasper are the largest municipalities currently part of West Yellowhead, according to Elections Alberta.

“We share a lot of common goals and a lot of common issues that we can work on together collectively,” Chichak added.

County mayors react

Woodlands County Mayor Jim Rennie was similarly supportive of the proposed redistribution, but was not without his criticisms.

“The more that I have a chance to reflect on it, while the geography is certainly going to be a challenge, it really is going to be an energy powerhouse of a constituency,” said Rennie.

Edson, Hinton, Jasper, Woodlands County and Whitecourt all have abundant forestry, and excluding Jasper, are rich in energy resources, he said.

However, this wasn’t what Woodlands County suggested to the commission, given the vast geographical distance between the proposed riding’s municipalities, Rennie said.

“We were trying to find a geographically centred bit,” he said. “You don’t want to have these huge ridings, but I think the solution they came up with for Woodlands County was a pretty good one.”

This geographical concern is why Lac Ste. Anne County Mayor Bill Hegy said he opposes the proposed changes.

“The idea of trying to make all areas somewhat equal in population just doesn’t match the reality of the province,” said Hegy. “Our preference is for things to stay the same.”

He added that if the proposed changes do go through, he wants to see the entirety of Lac Ste. Anne County included in the Ste. Anne-Stony Plain riding, rather than a small western portion of the county split into West Yellowhead, as is currently proposed.

“We’d prefer having everything in one riding,” said Hegy.

Whitecourt-Ste. Anne MLA speaks

Oneil Carlier, the Whitecourt-Ste. Anne MLA, called the proposals “very preliminary.”

“People can expect some changes, but as the first draft, I think we need to step back and see where we might be with the final draft,” he said.

“Right now, it generates some interesting conversation, but it’s really too preliminary to make any decisions based on how that might affect any particular MLA,” added Carlier.

Ultimately, any final decision on riding changes will be made by the commission, which Carlier stressed is non-partisan.

“The commission itself is independent from government, so they make their determination based on what’s best for Alberta voters, based on a lot of things, not just demographics, but geography (and) types of industry,” he said.

Public hearings for feedback on the interim boundaries are scheduled on July 17 and 21 in Grande Prairie, Vermilion, Edmonton, Calgary and Brooks.

Albertans can also submit written recommendations to the commission until July 8.

 

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Crime, Published Articles

Drug bust, 122 charges laid

Originally published in the Whitecourt Star

Four people from the Woodlands County area are facing a combined 122 charges after a large drug and gun bust, police announced on March 23.

Whitecourt RCMP and Alberta Law Enforcement Response Teams (ALERT) concluded a two-month investigation with their execution of search warrants on March 14 at a Whitecourt home and a Woodlands County rural residence.

Police seized more than $30,000 worth of drugs — 310 grams of cocaine, 77 Percocet pills and 119 methadone pills — as well as three handguns, three shotguns and 16 rifles. They also seized a cocaine press and $8,580 cash from drug deals.

“A bust like this is quite significant for Whitecourt,” said ALERT communications director Mike Tucker. “None of those guns were lawfully possessed and we believe they pose a significant public safety risk.”

Tucker said that the nine days between the raid and its announcement was the result of tying up the investigation’s loose ends.

“There could be elements that are still ongoing,” he said.

According to ALERT’s news release, “in at least three instances firearms were lawfully acquired before being diverted into the hands of suspected criminals.”

The investigation began with a tip about alleged drug trafficking, Tucker said.

“This began with information that was received on this group. We believed that they were trafficking cocaine in the Whitecourt area and some of the surrounding communities. We worked hand-in-hand with detachment there to develop intel and enforcement strategy,” he said.

Tucker declined to disclose how many officers and agents were involved in the investigation.

Whitecourt Mayor Maryann Chichak praised this collaboration between the local RCMP and ALERT.

“This investigation and outcome is a great example of how ALERT works collaboratively with the Whitecourt RCMP Detachment to address serious crime issues. Our community appreciates and values the work that ALERT does throughout the province and in our community to keep our residents safe,” she said in a news release.

The 122 charges are spread amongst four people.

Jeffrey Smith, 30, from Whitecourt faces 29 charges; Clayton Taylor, 23, from Woodlands County faces 45 charges; and Alyssa Leakvold, 25, from Woodlands county faces 45 charges.

Dustin Jennings, 24, of Fort Assiniboine faces an additional three charges for firearms trafficking offences.

They are slated to appear at Whitecourt Provincial Court on March 28.

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Data, Published Articles

Whitecourt, Woodlands County growing

Originally published in the Whitecourt Star

Whitecourt and Woodlands County are both growing, while Mayerthorpe got a bit smaller, according to the most recent census data released Feb. 8.

Whitecourt’s population increased to 10,204 from 9,605 in 2011, when the last census was released — an increase of 6.2 per cent.

However, this is a slight decrease from the municipal census of 2013, which put the town’s population at 10,574, resulting in 370 more people than the 2016 federal survey.

Mayor Maryann Chichak attributed this discrepancy to differing methodologies in gathering census data.

“More visits are done to households to ensure that they’re counted in the municipal census,” she said.

“We did online. We did door-to-door. We’d go back two, three, four times to ensure we got an answer. Unfortunately, with a federal census, they made two or three attempts and if they don’t have a response back, then the houses aren’t counted,” she said.

Chichak estimated that there’s a five per cent variance between municipal and federal numbers.

“When you compare apples to apples, it was nice to see that continued steady growth from the last federal one,” she said.

Mayor pleased with Woodlands’ “healthy” growth

Woodlands County Mayor Jim Rennie was thrilled that the census showed his municipality’s population increase to 4,574 from 4,306, a growth of 10.4 per cent.

“The Edmonton Journal called themselves the fastest growing city in Canada and their percentage wasn’t a lot higher than ours,” he said.

According to the census, Edmonton grew by 14.8 per cent between 2011 and 2016.

The provincial average for Alberta is 11.6 per cent, making it the fastest growing province. The national average is five per cent.

“We’re a community that’s lucky to be blessed with growth,” said Rennie, calling the population increase “healthy” and “somewhat balanced.”

Mayerthorpe got smaller

But not all towns in Alberta grew from one census to the other.

Mayerthorpe’s population shrank by 5.6 per cent to 1,320, losing 78 people, since the federal census in 2011.

Lac Ste. Anne County, where Mayerthorpe is located, increased its population 6.2 per cent to 10,899 from 10,260 in the same timeframe.

“The population figures are disappointing and they’re not really unexpected,” Mayerthorpe Mayor Kate Patrick said, citing the economic downturn in the oilpatch as a factor in the decrease.

“We have a lot of oil and gas industry workers who lost their jobs in the last year.”

Patrick said that if the census was taken today, she believes the results would be different.

This is why she wants council to take a municipal census, which may not happen until 2018.

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